One Part Water, Two Parts Starch: Performing oobleck as political resistance

Josh Widera

Abstract


Oobleck is two things: a non-Newtonian fluid, a mixture of cornstarch and water showing properties of both a liquid and a solid; and an invention by Dr. Seuss, an odd green weather occurrence who’s fluid, adhesive, and elastic attributes manage to threaten the entire state apparatus of the “Kingdom of Didd.” Re-viewing the children’s book Bartholomew and the Oobleck, and in light of its starch-and-water namesake, I argue that we can learn an insurrective strategy of political resistance from its performativity.


Keywords


non-human studies; performativity; activism; anarchism; reisistance; oobleck; literature; inopertativity; vulnerability; occupy; plant philosophy; gilets jaunes; plasticity

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21476/PP.2019.51265

Copyright (c) 2019 Josh Widera

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